Lyme disease isn’t something that you would ever wish upon another person. It ravages the body, mind, and soul, unlike any other infection. The physical symptoms are grueling, but the mental and emotional symptoms at times are nearly unbearable. Dr. Judith Miklossy has studied the effect of spirochetes on the brain and has found that 25.3% of Alzheimer’s patients have been found to have Lyme spirochetes in their brain. This is 13x more than the control tissues formed. If Lyme can invade the brain and possible cause dementia and Alzheimers, what else is it capable of doing in the brain? I have found in clinical practice that many Lyme disease patients have severe depression, anxiety, hopelessness, fear, and seem to be stuck in a vicious cycle that they just can’t quite break out of. After trying so many different treatments and therapies that have been unsuccessful, they often times feel stuck and paralyzed. They almost succumb to the effects of the disease and are no longer interested in making decisions to fight the disease that has stolen their life from them. I know that this is true because it happened in my own life. I was diagnosed with Lyme disease in 2014 but had been sick for some time before the diagnosis. I yearned to live a “normal” life again. I wanted to experience the joys of life that those around me were experiencing. I was hopeful so many times, but after multiple failed treatment approaches, I would dive into a hopelessness that I may never feel like myself again. Having Lyme disease was one of the worst and best things that ever happened to me. It forced me to bury myself in research. The thousands of hours and restless nights that I spent reading and studying this disease led me to rethink how to approach treating it. I had been trying to play God and figure out exactly what I needed to do to try and kill the spirochetes and rid them of my system and my patient’s systems. The truth that I came to realize is that my body is much smarter than my mind. I couldn’t outthink this disease. I needed to build up the body and the immune system because it knew what to do from there. So, the big question is what ended up working for me? I was diligent. I never gave up—even though there were times that I definitely wanted to. Eventually, I got to the point where I was done being the victim to this punishing disease. I needed to prove to myself how strong my body and my mind was. The mind will often times quite before the physical body. I hadn’t been able to work out for over two years and one day I got up and decided to go for a run. I didn’t care if I was dizzy, lightheaded, achy, passing out, or too sick to continue on. I needed to prove to myself that my body is strong and is able to overcome. Now, this is not the approach that I recommend for most of my patients—so be sure to contact your healthcare practitioner before doing anything too crazy! I laced up my running shoes, put my headphones in and put one foot in front of the other. The entire run was torturous… but I made it 2.5 miles without dying. My body had done it. I felt horrible, but two days later I ran 2.75 miles, and two days later a little further. The more I ran, the better my body felt overall. It strengthened my philosophy that in order to defeat a disease like Lyme, I needed to give the body what it needs to heal. After that first run, I never looked back. I decided that every treatment that didn’t work, was just a step that I needed to take to build up my body. My mission is greater than just allowing one person to live a “normal” life again. My mission is to bring hope to those who have lost it. My mission is to allow someone to live an extraordinary life and a life of beautiful abundance. If you are going through Lyme, don’t lose hope. Find a practitioner that is willing to go the extra mile and that works on building and not breaking down. If there is one thing I could tell every Lyme patient in this world, it is to hold on and to know that you are not going crazy. Your symptoms are very real—even when people tell you that you look fine. Stay strong and together we can and will conquer this disease.Lyme disease isn’t something that you would ever wish upon another person. It ravages the body, mind, and soul, unlike any other infection. The physical symptoms are grueling, but the mental and emotional symptoms at times are nearly unbearable. Dr. Judith Miklossy has studied the effect of spirochetes on the brain and has found that 25.3% of Alzheimer’s patients have been found to have Lyme spirochetes in their brain. This is 13x more than the control tissues formed. If Lyme can invade the brain and possible cause dementia and Alzheimers, what else is it capable of doing in the brain? I have found in clinical practice that many Lyme disease patients have severe depression, anxiety, hopelessness, fear, and seem to be stuck in a vicious cycle that they just can’t quite break out of. After trying so many different treatments and therapies that have been unsuccessful, they often times feel stuck and paralyzed. They almost succumb to the effects of the disease and are no longer interested in making decisions to fight the disease that has stolen their life from them. I know that this is true because it happened in my own life. I was diagnosed with Lyme disease in 2014 but had been sick for some time before the diagnosis. I yearned to live a “normal” life again. I wanted to experience the joys of life that those around me were experiencing. I was hopeful so many times, but after multiple failed treatment approaches, I would dive into a hopelessness that I may never feel like myself again. Having Lyme disease was one of the worst and best things that ever happened to me. It forced me to bury myself in research. The thousands of hours and restless nights that I spent reading and studying this disease led me to rethink how to approach treating it. I had been trying to play God and figure out exactly what I needed to do to try and kill the spirochetes and rid them of my system and my patient’s systems. The truth that I came to realize is that my body is much smarter than my mind. I couldn’t outthink this disease. I needed to build up the body and the immune system because it knew what to do from there. So, the big question is what ended up working for me? I was diligent. I never gave up—even though there were times that I definitely wanted to. Eventually, I got to the point where I was done being the victim to this punishing disease. I needed to prove to myself how strong my body and my mind was. The mind will often times quite before the physical body. I hadn’t been able to work out for over two years and one day I got up and decided to go for a run. I didn’t care if I was dizzy, lightheaded, achy, passing out, or too sick to continue on. I needed to prove to myself that my body is strong and is able to overcome. Now, this is not the approach that I recommend for most of my patients—so be sure to contact your healthcare practitioner before doing anything too crazy! I laced up my running shoes, put my headphones in and put one foot in front of the other. The entire run was torturous… but I made it 2.5 miles without dying. My body had done it. I felt horrible, but two days later I ran 2.75 miles, and two days later a little further. The more I ran, the better my body felt overall. It strengthened my philosophy that in order to defeat a disease like Lyme, I needed to give the body what it needs to heal. After that first run, I never looked back. I decided that every treatment that didn’t work, was just a step that I needed to take to build up my body. My mission is greater than just allowing one person to live a “normal” life again. My mission is to bring hope to those who have lost it. My mission is to allow someone to live an extraordinary life and a life of beautiful abundance. If you are going through Lyme, don’t lose hope. Find a practitioner that is willing to go the extra mile and that works on building and not breaking down. If there is one thing I could tell every Lyme patient in this world, it is to hold on and to know that you are not going crazy. Your symptoms are very real—even when people tell you that you look fine. Stay strong and together we can and will conquer this disease.